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History of Wolves


"Electrifying . . . as beautiful and as icy as the Minnesota woods where it's...
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Discuss History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund:
After she has become a part of Paul and Patra's daily routine, Linda still overstays her welcome some evenings and at one point lingers outside of their house, peering through their windows. Why do you think she keep watching them like this?

Created: 11/18/17

Replies: 9

Posted Nov. 18, 2017 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
davinamw

Join Date: 10/15/10

Posts: 1584

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After she has become a part of Paul and Patra's daily routine, Linda still overstays her welcome some evenings and at one point lingers outside of their house, peering through their windows. Why do you think she keep watching them like this?

After she has become a part of Paul and Patra's daily routine, Linda still overstays her welcome some evenings and at one point lingers outside of their house, peering through their windows. Why do you think she keep watching them like this?


Posted Nov. 27, 2017 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
Carol Rainer

Join Date: 09/03/15

Posts: 64

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RE: After she has become a part of Paul and Patra's daily routine, Linda still overstays her welcome some evenings and at one point lingers outside of their house, peering through their windows. Why do you think she keep watching them like this?

I think she sees herself as the missing ingredient at that point and is curious about their interaction toward each other.


Posted Nov. 28, 2017 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
JLPen77

Join Date: 02/05/16

Posts: 229

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RE: After she has become a part of Paul and Patra's daily routine, Linda still overstays her welcome some evenings and at one point lingers outside of their house, peering through their windows. Why do you think she keep watching them like this?

Her longing to belong, to have this kind of loving relationship, with a parent, with a friend, is so great, she can't easily let go of the closest thing she has to it. Her "stalking" is an effort to meet this need.


Posted Nov. 29, 2017 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
susiej

Join Date: 10/15/14

Posts: 162

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RE: After she has become a part of Paul and Patra's daily routine, Linda still overstays her welcome some evenings and at one point lingers outside of their house, peering through their windows. Why do you think she keep watching them like this?

Linda has very little to satisfy or fulfill her in any way in her own home life. Her need to be needed and to count or matter to someone for something more than she is at home may explain her hanging around and watching. Also, she may perceive Paul and Patra to be the loving family she lacks and may wish to see what that looks like since her own home life situation seems void of affection or even much communication. She sees herself as important to both these individuals for different reasons and may be watching to see how they interact with one another in her absence - almost as a way of determining if she might be replaced by one or the other.


Posted Dec. 01, 2017 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
reene

Join Date: 02/18/15

Posts: 311

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RE: After she has become a part of Paul and Patra's daily routine, Linda still overstays her welcome some evenings and at one point lingers outside of their house, peering through their windows. Why do you think she keep watching them like this?

Linda is fourteen and is curious to see how "normal" couples interact. She does realize her family unit is not the "normal" family. Perhaps she is hoping to play a larger role in this family, but she also seems content to go home and clean the fish. She is searching to find herself and I believe that deep down inside, she realizes that there is something wrong with Paul and his family and she can't seem to put her finger on it.


Posted Dec. 03, 2017 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
jww

Join Date: 05/31/11

Posts: 148

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RE: After she has become a part of Paul and Patra's daily routine, Linda still overstays her welcome some evenings and at one point lingers outside of their house, peering through their windows. Why do you think she keep watching them like this?

Linda has had little to no supervision or training in any life skills other than the basics. She is socially backward and incapable of understanding how society works. She is curious about Paul and Patra. She wants to see what they are like together and subconsciously wants to be a part of their life. She is lonely and alone. She is immature and doesn't have a clue how to act in most circumstances. She is the lone wolf, watching and waiting.


Posted Dec. 03, 2017 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
madelonw

Join Date: 11/20/17

Posts: 18

RE: After she has become a part of Paul and Patra's daily routine, Linda still overstays her welcome some evenings and at one point lingers outside of their house, peering through their windows. Why do you think she keep watching them like this?

Linda, herself, is like a wolf studying her prey. I do not think she meant Patra or Paul harm. An outsider who is very smart, she spends a lot of time alone and thinking. She needed attention from adults on which to model appropriate social interactions but did not get that from her parents or her teachers. More overt acts of love from her parents and she may not have been so focused on this family.


Posted Dec. 04, 2017 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
rebeccak

Join Date: 05/26/12

Posts: 48

RE: After she has become a part of Paul and Patra's daily routine, Linda still overstays her welcome some evenings and at one point lingers outside of their house, peering through their windows. Why do you think she keep watching them like this?

To some extent, the family is a bit of a novelty to Linda. It's one nuclear family living under the same roof (rather than her experience as a young child at the commune) and they have electricity, they eat and play together, etc. Part of it is also her longing for some connection in the world. Since the other commune members left, her own parents seem distant and a bit uninterested in her. To contrast, she probably feels needed and part of something at Paul and Patra's home in a way that she doesn't feel at her own home.


Posted Dec. 04, 2017 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
marganna

Join Date: 10/14/11

Posts: 111

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RE: After she has become a part of Paul and Patra's daily routine, Linda still overstays her welcome some evenings and at one point lingers outside of their house, peering through their windows. Why do you think she keep watching them like this?

She wants to be part of their family; she is curious about their family life; she is fascinated about the sexual encounters between Petra & Leo. She has never had any nurturing or being part of a family. Who would want to go back to her home? She longs to be part of a family in a more normal household.


Posted Dec. 18, 2017 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
acstrine

Join Date: 02/06/17

Posts: 59

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RE: After she has become a part of Paul and Patra's daily routine, Linda still overstays her welcome some evenings and at one point lingers outside of their house, peering through their windows. Why do you think she keep watching them like this?

Linda lived in a home with other people, but there was very little interaction among them. Her father stayed outside in the shed doing his thing. Her mom sat in the dark sewing or working on other projects that she would not share with Linda. Her mother used very impersonal and demeaning terms when talking with Linda (The Teenager, The CEO). Linda's cabin was very isolated. When Paul, Patra, and Leo moved in, Linda saw and then became a part of a very different family dynamic. The house was bright, warm, and cozy. Paul was an important part of the home. It was hard for Linda to leave and go back to her own home now that she was experiencing something different. I think she was afraid of losing what she had found or afraid that she would be forgotten if she was not there. She would miss something wonderful.

I think Linda stayed after the return from Duluth because she knew something was not quite right. I do not think she was aware of the seriousness of Paul's condition, but she did not trust Leo alone in the house with Paul and Patra. I think she was able to sense Patra's unease, and in her own way, wanted to offer her comfort.


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