Advance reader reviews of Murderers in Mausoleums

Murderers in Mausoleums

Riding the Back Roads of Empire Between Moscow and Beijing

by Jeffrey Tayler

Murderers in Mausoleums

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  • Donna Lynn Edwards (New Milford CT)


    Murderers in Mausoleums
    Reading Murderers in Mausoleums, you will gain a vital understanding of Russia and China; their culture, their ideals, their fears, their struggles as our global neighbors. Jeffrey Tayler, is a correspondent whose purpose in writing the book is to find out for himself how the people who were once the oppressed are now viewing a renaissance taking place in their countries. He also wants to talk with the people deep within the country, to get a sense of how they feel about the West, especially the United States. What he hears will astonish you.

    The book is a journal of his 7,200 mile trip that begins in Red Square and ends in Tiananmen Square. Travel is undeniably a hardship with many obstacles to overcome. Schedules are not always followed. Passports are checked with no consistency. The ubiquitous guards perusing papers will often hold Tayler for a payoff, or just to be officious and obnoxious. He endures extreme hostile climatic conditions, stress from potential threats to his life and difficult barriers that others would not have endured. I applaud with my deepest respect his valiant pursuit to achieve his goal. Some areas he visited he claims no westerner has ever seen. Amazing!

    Murderers in Mausoleums a reference to the leaders who we now know were not rulers as much as murderers, has the excitement of a novel. At the same time it contains a valuable visual and oral history. This plurality creates a harmonious balance that should capture the attention of those readers who shun history books. You will definitely gain more global awareness so necessary in today’s troubled times.

    Jeffrey Tayler the transcontinental traveler who stops at nothing to get an interview, offers a rare insiders look from so far away. Shocking and alluring, this book offers both. 5 out of 5
  • Diane (Santa Clara CA)


    Murderers In Mausoleums
    I really liked this book. It combines historical background with a fascinating journey through countries which used to be part of the Soviet Union - from Georgia to Kazakhstan and Western China, Jeffrey Tayler paints a portrait of the current economic, cultural and ethnic situations through meetings with local political activists, artists and many others. His descriptions of his hair-raising car and bus journeys make one feel as if you too barely survived them. This book is particularly relevant given the recent incursion by Russia into Georgia. Fascinating and valuable insights into countries which may be in the headlines in the future.
  • Ganesh Prasad (Sunnyvale CA)


    Russia to China: Past and Present
    The most interesting part is the parallel flow of information from the past and the present. Jeffrey Tayler, who seems to know this subject well and also who speaks various languages, has done a very good job of explaining the facts, as he knows, as he interviews and talks to people. He takes us all the way from Russia to China and in the most practical way. Even more interesting is that we are never lost in this journey. I would agree with rest of the readers who have commented that this is an interesting book and I recommend reading this.
  • Laura (Los Angeles CA)


    From Moa to Moscow
    The world is just starting to recognize the renewed power and strength - both politically and economically - of Russia and China. Yet most of us in the West don't have a clue when it comes to the culture and internal politics that shape them. Jeffrey Tayler's unique book uses a microscope to examine some of the most interesting backwaters in between these two giants. He talks to rebellious Cossacks, Muslim minorities and Genghis Khan worshipping Mongols excavating their fears, motivations and passions. It develops into more of an anthropological or ethnographic study as Tayler gathers stories full of nationalistic fervor and closely held cultural mythologies.

    This is an important book for anyone interested in world affairs especially given the recent conflicts in the area.
  • Gunta (Glens Falls NY)


    History and Geography All in One
    It is the most comprehensive book on Russia I have ever read, in English.

    If one has been harboring a desire to travel through Mother Russia of long ago, as well as, experience the current Russia, after the break up of the Soviet Union in 1991 but has been afraid to do so because of language barriers , this is the guide. Armed with this book and a good map, a dictionary of all languages and dialects of Russia, all is possible.

    This is the largest land mass on our planet. All climates, all terrains, all levels of education, all levels of ignorance due to what we know as civilization having not touched some of these people since the days of Genghis Khan.

    Jeffrey Tayler starts his journey by train in Moscow. He covers all nations and peoples from that point to Beijing, China. The boundaries, histories and peoples of Chechna, the Tatars, the Yakuts, the Ingus.The lands and history of the Kazaks are discussed at great length. The Greeks brought Christianity to the people of Ossetia and the Georgians. Facts such as: the Ural River being the waterway that to Russian tradition divides Europe from Asia. Descriptions of Suleyman Mountain and Kyrgyzstan's Capital Osh. Mention of many writers on the classic list of Russia's elite, such as Turgenev, Pushkin, Lermontov and most interesting the ballet dancer Boris Gudonov having been born a Tatar. Aside from these little tidbits of history and geography "Murderers in Mausoleums" holds a wealth of information useful to the amateur or the serious scholar of Russia, its former satellites and current crop of countries seceaded from Soviet Union. The book also has a chapter on Karaganda the architecturally ugly site built by the Soviets and even more ugly in human decadence of the soul, a place that was used as a Gulag during the Soviet Regime. Many interesting interviews and conversations between Jeffrey Tayler and young people he meets in his travels and throughout it all the marvelous feeling that one is not reading a dry travelog but a novel with sensual characters and history celebrating the spirit and traditions of a great people.

    I recommend this book to anyone whois interested in Russia and its history from the time of Genghis Khan to the present.
  • Jean (Worcester MA)


    Murderers in Mausoleums
    Jeffrey Tayler takes a trip, a very educational trip.
    One that introduces us to the lives and beliefs of a
    group of people , who for the most part, are
    unknown to Westerners.Tayler, through skillful
    questioning and experienced observation, makes us a partner on this journey. We feel the cold,
    perspire in the desert and begin to understand
    why the peoples of these areas believe as they do.
    We come away from this book realizing we must
    rethink our world position, and ignore this area
    of the world at our own peril.This is a thought provoking book that should be part of school reading assignments and a choice of Book Clubs.
  • C (Wauwatosa WI)


    Murderers In Mausoleums
    Get out your Atlas as you follow Jeffrey Tayler's travels in Murderers In Mausoleums. The author takes you on a sometimes too detailed trip describing history at great length and spending too much time talking about the landscape as he traveled. While I found that interesting, I would have preferred more about the people he met and the discussions they had about "why democracy isn't thriving" as we Westerners think it should be. Overall, not what I expected from the book jacket description, but interesting nonetheless.
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