Advance reader reviews of How the Light Gets In

How the Light Gets In

A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel

by Louise Penny

How the Light Gets In
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  • Published in USA  Aug 2013
    416 pages
    Genre: Mysteries

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There are currently 39 member reviews
for How the Light Gets In
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  • Carolyn G. (Catskill, NY)


    Do yourself a favor and read this book!
    Louise Penny's latest Chief Inspector Armand Gamache mystery, set in Quebec and alternating between the the urban and countryside settings so well known to her faithful readers, is a triumph of suspense and decades long secrets. I loved how all of the pieces came together at the end and how I didn't have to remember details of her previous works to appreciate this dazzling, if slowly evolving, mystery of greed, evil, loneliness and, finally, terror. Her protagonist, the Chief Inspector, is supported by a coterie of characters living in Three Pines, the tea cosy village where Gamache is welcomed as he investigates one murder and solves a second, enormous province-wide threat that affects those he loves and those who have no idea that they are being threatened. I really enjoyed getting to know the Chief better and understanding what drives him. Penny does an excellent job of drawing you in and allowing you to watch a great, investigative mind at work. The only thing missing was the occasional wise-beyond-their-years children, but I forgive Penny this lapse because there was Rosa the Duck and who could ask for more? I highly recommend this book and can't wait to go back and reread Penny's eight other offerings. Thank you BookBrowse for bringing enjoyment to my life!
  • Pam S. (Wellesley, MA)


    Surprising how interesting a little Quebec village can be!
    Although this is the eighth in the author's series of mysteries set in rural Quebec and featuring Montreal homicide detective Armande Gamache, it was the first of the series that I have read. The story was interesting, fast-paced and complicated in the best possible way. There were two major parallel story lines - one involving the murder of a reclusive elderly woman just before she was to travel to tiny Quebec village Three Pines for Christmas; the other involving a massive government conspiracy. Gamache is a thoughtful middle aged less-than-successful detective whose understanding of human nature is an important element in his solving cases and mysteries. Although set in a completely different location, the book reminded me of the Inspector Guido Brunetti mysteries set in Venice by Donna Leon. In both series, characters (the detective and his family and friends) and setting are important aspects of the stories. Psychological investigation is important in both as well and it is often an understanding of human nature that leads the investigator to discover the truth. This was my first Louise Penny mystery but will definitely not be my last.
  • Lois P. (Logan, UT)


    Expectations Exceeded
    I'd like to join Louise Penny's many fans in a standing ovation! What a wonderful Three Pines mystery--compelling, complex and beautifully written. I didn't want to leave the company of Inspector Gamache and his friends. Lovers of interesting, character-driven stories shouldn't miss this series.
  • Jennifer B. (Oviedo, FL)


    How the Light Gets In
    Mystery stories should be enthralling. This book does that and even surpasses previous Armand Gamache books. The suspenceful turns captured my attention. Louise Penny's graceful use of language reminds me of O. Henry in style. I look forward to each of her books like a child anticipates Christmas!
  • Susan M. (Ashland, OR)


    How the Light Gets In
    Penny is a gifted writer! Having read her previous books in the Chief Inspector Gamache series I wondered how she would tie up loose ends. She did so in unexpected ways which left me marveling at how it she made it work.
    She has the ability to make you feel the stinging cold of driving snow on hot July day.
    This book does stand alone if you've not read the others in this series but why deprive yourself of a good read.
  • Deborah C. (Seattle, WA)


    Another Winner From Louise Penny!
    I am a huge Louise Penny fan but was really disappointed with her last book, The Beautiful Mystery, which I thought was boring and slow. I am happy to report that she is back on track!

    One of the main reasons I like Louise Penny is that she does such a good job of developing her characters--they are real and imperfect people who grow and change, not just cardboard cutouts as is often the case in other mysteries. I also love her descriptions of Three Pines--she makes it sound so idyllic that I wish it were a real place so that I could move there!

    How the Light Gets In ties up some loose ends from previous books, so I would not recommend starting with it. This is not a fast-paced mystery with lots of action, but anyone who enjoys good writing and fascinating characters will love this book.
  • Sharon W. (Columbia, SC)


    Once Again
    Louise Penny never fails to deliver. Her prose captures me completely, making me want to know Gamache, visit Quebec, and follow the trail to discovery myself. How the Light Gets In is another delightful mystery from Louise Penny. Her writing is poetic! Other mystery fans are sure to love this novel, too.

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