Read what people think about The Lost and Forgotten Languages of Shanghai by Ruiyan Xu, and write your own review.

Summary | Reviews | More Information | More Books

The Lost and Forgotten Languages of Shanghai

A Novel

By Ruiyan Xu

The Lost and Forgotten Languages of Shanghai

Buy This Book

About this book

Reviews

Page 1 of 5
There are currently 33 reader reviews for The Lost and Forgotten Languages of Shanghai
Order Reviews by:

Write your own review!

Louise J (08/11/12)

Good But a Tad Too Long
This was an interesting read however I found it to be a bit too long. The author could have shortened this story and still got her point across. I felt she went into too much detail and almost kept repeating the same things over and over only in different ways. I am glad I read the book, it just seemed a bit too long and I was thinking when is the end coming, let’s cut the on and on and get this finished up.
Mary O. (Boston, MA) (11/09/10)

the haunting way language taunts us
This is a debut novel that paints a very haunting picture of loneliness, love and pain. The sing song lyrical quality of the prose reads almost like poetry. It evokes emotional isolation from page one and captures you until you finish the last page - I couldn't put this book down! It truly shows how silent and verbal communication, language and culture bond people together and painfully break them apart. A great debut for a highly talented author -
Therese X. (CALERA, AL) (11/08/10)

The Lost and Forgotten Languages of Shanghai
Communication is taken for granted in modern life, but what if a person suddenly loses the ability to respond in their own language, despite understanding the conversation? In the grand Swan Hotel in Shanghai, workaholic businessman, Li Jing and his father, Professor Li are drinking tea when a gas explosion rips the place--and their lives--apart. A shard of glass enters Li Jing’s forehead and when doctors try to communicate with him, he can only utter syllables in a strange language: English, Jing's first language, learned during childhood in Virginia before the family moved to Shanghai. Li Jing has spoken Chinese ever since. He courted his beautiful wife, Meiling, with all the beauty of the language, and now she can no longer communicate with him. Her icy tone of disappointment causes him such grief, he refuses to look at anyone who comes into his hospital room. In desperation, Meiling agrees to engage an American neurologist, Dr. Rosalyn Neal, who specializes in his condition: “bilingual aphasia”. Dr Neal has her own personal difficulties and this offer seems not only a chance for research into her field of study, but a well-needed challenge. She underestimates the consequences, however, especially the fact that she does not know a word of Chinese! Her initial days in this teeming city are so well described in the novel, a sense of buzzing, nonverbal “claustrophobia” affects both her and the reader.

In this beautifully written novel, the concept of language goes beyond mere conversational abilities. Language permeates everything: behavior, traditions,even personal relationships where words were formerly not necessary. Meiling’s impatience with her husband’s continuing disability, her son’s confusion with the change in his family, and this gregarious American neurologist’s constant stream of English keeps Li Jing mired in the language he has no use for and pushes Meiling farther away weakening the bond between them. When Li Jing’s business partners question her about his return, she is determined to keep his real condition a secret and takes his place, learning the business language of stocks, bonds and profits in order to keep the company afloat which depended on her husband’s former charisma and easy way with difficult customers. Again, communication is the key factor. One single action, a terrible explosion and one man’s disability causes many lives to fracture as a result of the loss of his “language of Shanghai”. Author Ruiyan Xu’s first novel is a marvelous, multifaceted journey into the world of language and human communication as well as the lack of it. Many rivulets of change combine to make and remake lives, and this could happen to any one of us.
DawnEllen J. (Riverside, CA) (11/02/10)

Lost and Forgotten - hardly!
"The Lost and Languages of Shanghai" is a hauntingly beautiful tale through which author Ruiyan Xu explores the subtle nuances of language and the role it plays in culture, identity, and relationships. When an accident severs Li Jing from his ability to speak Chinese, he is forced to communicate only in his nearly forgotten childhood English. Although physically able to recover, Li Jing's ability to interact with those around him is irreparably damaged. Li Jing and his beloved wife Meiling are trapped in their separate prison houses of language, to use Fredric Jamison's metaphor, unable to break through the walls of silence that now engulf them. The magic of this remarkable work lies in Xu's ability to capture the interior monologues of the characters in ways that engage the reader in their painful struggle to communicate that which they feel deeply but have no words to express.

The reader feels the anguish of Li Jing and Meiling because she, too, longs to cry out to them both and communicate what the other is feeling; but she too is mute, separated as she is from them by the construct of the reader/character relationship. Xu skillfully weaves flashbacks of the couple's relationship into the ongoing story of the way in which their inability to communicate with one another bifurcates their relationship and forces them to follow separate paths in search of new identities. More insidiously dangerous than the English-speaking doctor who threatens to come between them, is language, which inserts itself as a character in its own right. Language is vividly portrayed through the sensory imagery of an author who fully understands the power of the medium with which she works, but who also understands the power of love to overcome the insurmountable.
Carolyn G. (South Pasadena, CA) (11/01/10)

Good first novel
I wasn’t sure that I was going to like this novel when I first started reading. By the time I got to the third chapter, I was hooked. The central character is Li Jing, a bilingual Chinese business man. An accident leaves him with a type of autism which lets him only able to speak English. Most of the story is told through the experiences of Meiling, Li Jing’s wife and Dr. Rosalyn Neal an American neurologist hired to help Li Jing recover his linguistic skills. While the plot revolves around a traditional love triangle, Ruiyan Zu brings some insightful and sensitive descriptions to several emotional scenes. I wished that there had been more description of Shanghai as I enjoy reading about different places. This is a good first novel and I would like to read more by this author.
Natalya M. (Medical Lake, WA) (10/30/10)

Beautiful novel about language and relationships
A man goes has a brain injury and forgets his dominant language. He can only speak in English, the language he learned and used as a child. He can no longer communicate with his family and they enlist the help of a famous US neurologist, who specializes in bilingual amnesia.
The book is about the difficulties of language and how communication is the most important part of relationships. I feel the characters were very real and I could easily sympathize with them. The novel is beautifully written but I feel the ending could have been better.
Lori L. (La Porte, IN) (10/28/10)

The Power of Language
This beautifully written book explores the power of language and how we define ourselves through our speech. The characters in the book move together and come apart based on their ability to communicate. Words, with their ability to comfort and console as well as to destroy and alienate, take center stage. It was interesting to consider how much of an individual's personality is determined by their ability to express themselves to others, as well as how much that expression can deviate from the person's inner, private life.
Marci G. (Southern New Jersey) (10/27/10)

Loss of Language... Loss of Self ?
As a nurse working on an acute rehabilitation unit, I was very drawn to the book. I cared for a stroke patient who lost her ability to speak English but could communicate in her primary language. Fascinating!!! To read this beautifully written book that merges science and the heart so well. The frustration of all parties involved is palpable. I was also drawn by the parallel between Rosalyn's sense of isolation and Li Jing's. Who are we if we are taken out of the context of our daily lives ? Successful business man, father, son, husband...

More Information

Readalikes

Member Benefits

Join Now!

Check the advantages!
Just $10 for 3 months or $35 for a year

    •  
    • FREE
    • MEMBER
    • Range of media reviews for each book
    • Excerpts of all featured books
    • Author bios, interviews and pronunciations
    • Browse by genre
    • Book club discussions
    • Book club advice and reading guides
    • BookBrowse reviews and "beyond the book" back-stories
    •  
    • Reviews of notable books ahead of publication
    •  
    • Free books to read and review (US Only)
    •  
    • Browse for the best books by time period, setting & theme
    •  
    • Read-alike suggestions for thousands of books and authors
    •  
    • 'My Reading List" to keep track of your books
    •  

Editor's Choice

  • Book Jacket: The Goldfinch
    The Goldfinch
    by Donna Tartt
    Winner of the 2014 Pulitzer for Fiction.

    Her canvas is vast. To frame a story about art, love and ...
  • Book Jacket: Toms River
    Toms River
    by Dan Fagin
    Winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction

    In Toms River, investigative journalist Dan Fagin ...
  • Book Jacket: The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry
    The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry
    by Gabrielle Zevin
    I feel like Gabrielle Zevin wrote this wonderful book, about a lonely New England bookstore owner ...

First Impressions

Members read and review books ahead
of publication. See what they think
in First Impressions!

Books that
expand your
horizons.

Visitors can view a lot of BookBrowse for free. Full access is for members only

Find out more.

Book Discussions
Book Jacket

The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry
by Gabrielle Zevin

Published Apr. 2014

Join the discussion!

  1.  254Cartwheel:
    Jennifer duBois
  2.  143Happier at Home:
    Gretchen Rubin

All Discussions

Who Said...

Flaming enthusiasm, backed up by horse sense and persistence, is the quality that most frequently makes for ...

Click Here to find out who said this, as well as discovering other famous literary quotes!

Word Play

Solve this clue:

P Your O C

and be entered to win..

Books thatinspire you.Handpicked.

Books you'll stay up all night reading; books that will whisk you to faraway places and times, books that will expand your mind and inspire you -- the kinds of books you just can't wait to tell your friends about.