Reader reviews and comments on The Clash of Civilizations, plus links to write your own review.

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The Clash of Civilizations

and The Remaking of World Order

By Samuel P. Huntington

The Clash of Civilizations
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  • Hardcover: Jun 1998,
    368 pages.
    Paperback: Dec 1997,
    367 pages.

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There are currently 8 reader reviews for The Clash of Civilizations
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misha (02/01/05)

The guy is a disgrace to mankind. It seems to me that he has already made up his mind about the faith of the middle east without properly researching the facts. Any conscious human being with half a brain would know better, (especially a harvard professor) come to think of it.
haha (07/25/04)

harvard professor? well, he seems to be a patriotic <<edited>> (uhh..this word is forbidden) ...he has no idea of international knowledge. sorry, but i hope nobody will listen to what he's saying.
thanks.
larry b. (03/10/04)

That book is unique in scope, readability. and integrity. It's highly informative and explanatory.
It's written from the point of view of an American, who is fully aware that he presents the western view on world peace,
and world's conflicts: the actual and the future ones. The author's personal view as a westerner is interesting and insigthful,
however the reader needs to bear in mind that it doesn't represent any official version of the present and the future.
The book paints a sober and frequently troubling picture of human civilisations, in their struggle over domination.
In its last part there is a cautious optimism about the possibility of peaceful resolutions of the conflicts before they becomeworld wide.
The message of the author is clear and strong - a big warning before it's too late. It preaches tolerance and coexistence,
The book suggests improvements in the UN and other international institutions, as well as recommendations for new policies.

Excellent book: a landmark in political scholar-popular literature, of the secoand half of the 20 century. It's undoubtly a legacy of an highly intelligent and and widely learned scholar, and a civilised, wise and caring person.
Tyler_D (01/13/04)

The worst book ever!! I've never read such an historical ignorant text! Not only ignorant, it is completely wrong and just not true what he is saying! And to try and divide the world into 8 cultural groups is a schoolboy error!!
umesh shahane (09/17/03)

excellent book,
events on sept 11 have proved that clash is not going to stop.

CH (11/07/02)


Attention has to be drawn to the fact that Huntington in his view argues that Islamic and Christian cultures are contradictory and incompatible and he therefore recommends a form of political apartheit. This is directly comparable with the view of Afrikaner nationalists who built Bantustans for the same reasons-this position was completely rejected by Africans apart from the 'tribal' leaders who benefited from it. An extremely dangerous book!!!
asad (10/23/02)

Each civilization claims to be perfect or close to the perfect, but it is a relative term. The civilization or culture takes its roots from the particular soil. Old civilizations, in my view can only be blended with the invading ciilizations, but their way of living, culture, moral values and norms could hardly be altered. This clash of civilization is not a new thing, what white people had done to red indians,or the Spanish did to Inkas. Similarly the colonial powers ruled for centuries in places like India & Pakistan and blended their cultures. Even today at almost all the above mentioned places except U.S the roots of original cultures are still visible, and the traditions and living of original society has hardly changed. In present day scenario if west or any other civilization thinks it can intrude into culture and living of other weaker nations, it is almost imposible. This world has seen many powerful civilzations but in the due course of history only those impressions are left, which belong to the particular soil
yavuz anik (05/20/02)

why are all so prejudiced?

i know the answer: because we are arrogant and ignorant, that's our problem. if someone made a survey about foreign countries not a single person would know anything.

if we want to participate in discussions about foreign policy and foreign countries we need to get better knowledge about their history and need to understand their culture. when i look into some churches and their rules i think they have a lot of rules which are similar to taliban rules. just because cnn tells us they are bad we don't need to believe it. they are bad but some organisations in the u.s. are bad as well. we need to have critical thoughts about news amd opinions of politicians. we still believe that our westernized culture is better than the eastern backwards cultures but the reason for our superiority just comes from exploiting other countries. the hatred from the eastern world is just a direct result of the globalisation. with his book huntington just supports prejudices and hatred against the islam and the middle east.

what i personally totally disliked was that he thinks turkey is going to take a leading role in the islamic world. this is very unthankful because turkey is a very westernized country and the u.s. have their largest army base in a foreign country in turkey. from here they attack iraq. without turkey a strike against iraq or afghanistan wouldn't be possible.
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