Reader reviews and comments on The Poisonwood Bible, plus links to write your own review.

Summary |  Excerpt |  Reading Guide |  Reviews |  Readalikes |  Genres & Themes |  Author Bio

The Poisonwood Bible

By Barbara Kingsolver

The Poisonwood Bible
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

  • Hardcover: Oct 1998,
    543 pages.
    Paperback: Sep 1999,
    560 pages.

    Publication Information

  • Rate this book


Buy This Book

About this Book

Reviews

Page 5 of 17
There are currently 129 reader reviews for The Poisonwood Bible
Order Reviews by:

Write your own review!

Susan (10/22/04)

Wll, I'm sorry that you missed the whole point .... I'm sorry some people out there are so prejudiced that they can not enjoy a book that criticized their ideal, all-white, all-male, all-Christian society.
I personally enjoyed this book so much!!!! It is a wonderful, yet not over-romanticized story that really makes you look at life a whole different way. I was raised a Christian, currently attend a private school full of people that hold the same view of Christianity of Mr. Nathan Price, who thought being Christian made him better, when in fact every culture has the right to their own beliefs, and they are as right and entitled to practice them as you are. I loved being able to see life from all the different characters' perspectives, to learn about human nature, the irony of life. Well, if you are an open-minded person who does not mind reading a pretty long and fat book, you will enjoy this book. Otherwise, stay in your little bubble.
Two thumbs up.
Jbou (10/19/04)

An amazing work of political fiction. It is showered in colorful voices, American and African. The story traces the cause and effect of both a family and a culture's downfall. This is no small task and hardly a simple theme.
Jim Daly (10/14/04)

I would rate this a two. I don't think it was a successful story. The author tried so hard to make each narrator speak with a different voice, that they eventually became caricatures. Then the political message interfered with the story telling. A summary could be: Stupid white guy screws up family, et al; stupid white culture screws up Africa. And, that makes the theme a little simple.
James Farlow (09/27/04)

Garbage. When will people learn to think on their own?
Susan (08/17/04)

This is the best books I have ever read. The way the author tells the story from every character's point of view is really interesting. The character's are all well developed -- I hated to leave them at the end of the book. The story tells about a missionary family that travels to the Congo to convert the people to Christianity. Because they don't understand the culture their words become meaningless. The family believes they are going to the Congo to change the hearts of the people, but the real story is how the missionary family is changed instead.
John Cartaya (08/07/04)

Being and adent believer in the rights of the people of underdeveloped countries, and of the evils imposed by white parasitic and imperialistic societies mascarading themselves as "christians", I loved reading the ugly implications of all of the above.
Anna (08/04/04)

Incredible incite into fanatical missionary work through the eyes of 5 very different characters.
Each character is so well developed and portrayed, that it is diificult to believe that this is a work of fiction.
The various threads of the storyline are woven in such a way that the reader finds it extremely compelling.
I would recommend this book to all, it is simply, brilliant.
michelle (08/02/04)

I'm 14. I was assigned this book. I agree very much so with Haley. Although the book was very well written and was a great challenge for me to read, I found the book overly depressing. I understand that the author was trying to make a point but I strongly discourage anyone under the age of 16 from reading this book. The Poisonwood Bible covers a wide range of racial and politcal dissagreements I can't possibly understand at this young age. Therfore I got nothing out of this book other than: I discovered how very much I like the works of Emily Dickenson and I had the bejjeebees scared out of me. The story tells of a family falling apart. This is a very real fear to a young adolesant and this book intensifies that fear. It also magnifies the concept that the world is a big place and I am so small and utterly helpless. As a professing Christian I was also angered by the portrayal of Nathan Price who's character is a distorted view of Christianity. To those that are not of my faith this may cause them to accidentally sterotype people of my Faith. I found the culture of the Congolese fascinating but I feel the author was too radical in proving her point. Overall there is seriously not a happy moment in the book and unless you have reached complete mental maturaty do not, do not read this book.
Member Benefits

Join Now!

Check the advantages!
Just $10 for 3 months or $35 for a year

    •  
    • FREE
    • MEMBER
    • Range of media reviews for each book
    • Excerpts of all featured books
    • Author bios, interviews and pronunciations
    • Browse by genre
    • Book club discussions
    • Book club advice and reading guides
    • BookBrowse reviews and "beyond the book" back-stories
    •  
    • Reviews of notable books ahead of publication
    •  
    • Free books to read and review (US Only)
    •  
    • Browse for the best books by time period, setting & theme
    •  
    • Read-alike suggestions for thousands of books and authors
    •  
    • 'My Reading List" to keep track of your books
    •  
Sign up, win books!

Editor's Choice

  • Book Jacket: Take This Man
    Take This Man
    by Brando Skyhorse
    "A chorus of six men calling me Son might sound ludicrous to you, but to me it's the sound of ...
  • Book Jacket: The Hundred-Year House
    The Hundred-Year House
    by Rebecca Makkai
    Rebecca Makkai's sophomore novel The Hundred-Year House could just have easily been titled ...
  • Book Jacket
    The Valley of Amazement
    by Amy Tan
    "Mirror, Mirror on the wall
    I am my mother after all!"


    In my pre-retirement days as a professor ...

First Impressions

Members read and review books ahead
of publication. See what they think
in First Impressions!

Books that
expand your
horizons.

Visitors can view a lot of BookBrowse for free. Full access is for members only

Find out more.

Book Discussions
Book Jacket

The Arsonist
by Sue Miller

Published Jun. 2014

Join the discussion!

  1.  133Tomlinson Hill:
    Chris Tomlinson

All Discussions

Win this book!
Win The Angel of Losses

The Angel of Losses

"Family saga, mystery, and myth intersect in Feldman's debut novel." - Booklist

Enter

Word Play

Solve this clue:

E C H A Silver L

and be entered to win..

Books thatinspire you.Handpicked.

Books you'll stay up all night reading; books that will whisk you to faraway places and times, books that will expand your mind and inspire you -- the kinds of books you just can't wait to tell your friends about.