Reader reviews and comments on The Da Vinci Code, plus links to write your own review.

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The Da Vinci Code

By Dan Brown

The Da Vinci Code
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  • Hardcover: Mar 2003,
    464 pages.
    Paperback: Mar 2006,
    496 pages.

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There are currently 161 reader reviews for The Da Vinci Code
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anne bertrand (01/27/05)

I am a 61 year old Catholic, and have no plans to leave the faith because of Davinci. However, I read the book and had a good laugh. Its fiction people. Go look at the paintings if you must, try and find the clues. As a suspense novel, it had a fast and furious pace. As a mystery, well, I wasnt too mystified about most details, and very mystified by others. I have never read a book to check out my ability to find lilttle picky errors in details. This kind of adventure book is not the place to start. Everything was just wrapped up too neatly in the last few pages for a really good book. (in my opinion). I have never found a book in all my years of reading that caused such and uproar. You either love this book or hate this book. There is very little ground between. It all goes back to never argue about religion. Its Just a Book. Just A Fun Read.
Jensen (01/26/05)

Very good book! You better read it or else you will miss the one time opppertunity of reading the number one book in the entire world!!!!!
Lelo (01/23/05)

There are some incoherences in the novel. Everything seemed so easy for Langdon and Sophie. I mean, Mr. Vernet going out with them in a car of the bank without being noticed? Then, how did they escape from the cops in England? How did they escape in the museum? Come on!
Silas's fan (01/22/05)

I didnt like the ending. Too much fuss about nothing.
Ana Victoria Wo Ching Wong (01/21/05)

This book was interesting in the first chapters. Then it just turned predictable. I'm almost sure Mr. Brown has read The Brotherhood of the Rose (by David Morrel) and Umberto Eco's The name of the rose, but couldn't make a good book. I wonder why it is a bestseller. Some episodes of Third Watch are actually better written than this light "novel".
your average Joe (01/20/05)

This book was simply disappointing. It would make a nice Sunday afternoon movie, but that's it. It's just overloaded with clichés.
DO NOT WASTE YOUR MONEY.
MS 32 (01/20/05)

This novel was phenomenal. Dan Brown continues his excellence in writing, storytelling, and reader interest. I simply could not put this book down. I couldn't handle putting down his first Robert Langdon adventure "Angels & Demons". These books are so great for readers of all ages. I am in the youngest age group of readers for this book. As a young adult of 14, I appreciate this brilliant writing. Many of the books I read are fun and cute, yet they do not have superior plot development, action/adventure, romance, and intelligence. I enjoyed the book "Angels & Demons" even more than i did DVC. I also read Dan Brown's novel "Digital Fortress" and enjoyed that as well. I am currently in the middle of "Deception Point" which is the final Dan Brown novel in print. I am also anxiously awaiting his fifth book, the third in the Robert Langdon series.

P.S. - There is a great online treasure hunt type of activity involving codes and the "Da Vinci Code" book. The site is

www.randomhouse.com/doubleday/davinci/

it is very challenging and time consuming as well. "GOOGLE" is really helpful for this type of activity. I have completed most of it so far and can't wait for the time to finish the rest. When you have a day off, or when school or work gets a touch boring, visiting this site is a great task. Later...MS 32
Christoph Ackermann (01/18/05)

I am currently reading the DaVinci Code and have to say that I am a little bit disappointed. I will not go into the spiritual claims that Brown is making, but rather would like to highlight some basic (some might say trivial) errors.
I will just highlight some of the mistakes Brown makes regarding simple everyday items like cars. This might sound boring, but I think it highlights the general inaccuracy of the book and its bold statements.

1.   Regarding the ‘Smart Cat’, the Heroine claims that the car just consumes 1 liters per 100km, but a @Smart’ uses an average of 4.5 liters per 100km.

2.   Regarding the Taxi ride in Paris. Langdon tries to drive the Taxi, but being an American he cannot use a clutch (stereotype), so he accelerates to hard and the car tailgates away. European cars (especially Taxis) are mostly front wheel drive and would not tailgate, the few rear wheel drive cars used as taxis (usually Mercedes) are mostly fitted with an automatic. So there is no tail wagging.

3.   The drive in the Range Rover. The group tries to escape the police and heads into a forest. The butler is driving the car and gets the instruction to use the “emergency brake” to avoid using the brake lights. I never saw an emergency brake on a Range Rover and he surely does not suggest using the handbrake, as this action would result in the immediate loss of control over the car.

You might find these finding trivial, but I think they show how Brown alters information to suit his case. I leave to you to judge how this could be interpreted in regards to his claims about Christianity. I would like to admit that of course I am nagging about the most unimportant aspect of the book by picking out details like fuel consumption and the like.
However these details are usually "researchable" by the click of a button and I wonder why Brown chooses to mention these details in the first place. In fact he describes them so detailed that you have to wonder why as they are mostly irrellevant for most part of the story. If he feels so strongly about the fuel consumption then he should have looked it up or leave it out.
I think these details highlight the concern that Brown has spent most of his time making the story work, but it seems to fall apart once you scratch the surface.
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