Reader reviews and comments on Life of Pi, plus links to write your own review.

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Life of Pi

By Yann Martel

Life of Pi
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    Readers' Opinion:

  • Hardcover: May 2002,
    336 pages.
    Paperback: May 2003,
    336 pages.

    Publication Information

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There are currently 80 reader reviews for Life of Pi
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Mellisa P (04/22/04)

The best book I've read all year. I wanted more of the after-story and didn't want it to end.
Jennifer (04/02/04)

Amazing and beautiful-- It's one of those books that forces you to THINK and feel-- It demands to be contemplated and digested after reading.
Sara (03/28/04)

The Life of Pi is a book that really makes you think, makes you question the nature of human beings, God and religion, and truth. In response to the statement that the book is boring, it does get to be so about two-thirds of the way through, when Pi is on the raft. However, it picks up again once his new situation is firmly established. I think that it is difficult to continue reading at this point because the reader questions the believability of the plot after such a dramatic change. If you make it through this part, you will become absorbed in it. Yann Martel does an excellent job in setting up the plot, making everything seem credible and true. In the end, you will be satisfied by the book because of the underlying questions that it poses. Also, I was confused when I started reading because it is categorized as an animal adventure story, but this does not do it justice at all. The Life of Pi is so much more than a story about a boy in a raft on the Pacific. I felt that this book was one of the most worthwhile and meaningful books I have read, leaving you with new insights to the way life is when you are done.
Cindy (03/24/04)

This was one of the worst books i have read, my book club read it as our february pick and half of the people did not finish it. I have never picked up a book that I was unsure whether I was going to finish it or not. The majority of the book is on the raft and from the moment he got on the raft I wanted him off. Everything was explained in so much detail that it made for a extremly long and boring book. There was only one woman in our book club who actually enjoyed the book and we spent the meeting questioning her on why she enjoyed it and why we did not. I think that most people will give this book a high rating because of the awards that it received, not because of the content. Come on people, rock the boat a bit and don't follow the flock! Have you own opinions! Cheers

21 yrs old
Anonymous (03/12/04)

14 yrs. This book really rates more as a 3 1/2. It reminded me of My Side of the Mountain, except in the Pacific Ocean. This book leaves you wanting to read every detail about his truly amazing life on the sea. It was well writen. It's main flaws were that of my own, not the auther's, because I don't prefer the survival type books, and had I not read the introduction saying it the story was based on that of a real person's I couldn't have believed it!
aleyra (03/09/04)

Life of Pi, was not a book that I read through my own intentions, it was a compulsary novel for my year 11 english class. Despite this fact, the book turned out to be one of the best books that I have read. The line between reality and fiction was so fine, that I seemed to believe everything despite it being unbelievable, if that makes sense. His style of writing, mixed with the Pi's character, put me in the story. I finished reading the book and started to imagine my own actions in a situation such as Pi's. It is a book that you cannot talk much on, without disrupting the essence of he book to readers, so I will leave you with this. It was great!
Lois (03/07/04)


I found the book to be thoroughly entertaining, imaginative, and informative, especially in regards to knowing animal traits and survival. Yann Martel keeps you on the edge of your seat for the next exciting development in his story. The book is very descriptive, which in some instances was pretty gruesome, but that's life. It made it all the more realistic. It was also fascinating the way he brings together the three different religions into one person's belief and uses them for spiritual support throughout the book. I highly recommend this book for a good dose of humorous relief from the daily grind and to encourage us when we think we have problems!
azang1 (02/21/04)

I loved the story from the get go and was unable to put it down. I couldn't ascertain the meaning of the story at all on my own and asked around among my more literate friends.l They all were at the same impasse. We are not a dumb group but we were truly stumped. The story is too bizarre not to have an alternate meaning yet we couldn't figure it out, especially the part about the crazy meerkats and the aciditic, and man eating island. I enjoyed reading everyone elses comments and am still forming my own opinions about the symbolism and philisophical meaning in the book. overall I recommend this beautifully written fable and I enjoyed Yann Martel's lyrical writing style.
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